Webcasts On Demand

Webcast: What’s New in Container Storage
Tuesday, February 26, 2019
10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

Containers are a big trend in application deployment. The landscape of containers is moving fast and constantly changing, with new standards emerging every few months. Learn what’s new, what to pay attention to, and how to make sense of the ever-shifting container landscape.

Webcast: Why Composable Infrastructure?
Wednesday, February 13, 2019
10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

In this webcast, SNIA experts will discuss what composable infrastructure is, what prompted its development, solutions, enabling technologies, standards/products and what's on the horizon. 

Webcast: Cloud Mobility and Data Movement
Tuesday, August 7, 2018
Webcast - 10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

Eric Lakin, University of Michigan; Michelle Tidwell, IBM; Alex McDonald, NetApp

We’re increasingly in a multi-cloud environment, with potentially multiple private, public and hybrid cloud implementations in support of a single enterprise. Over time, some applications and data might need to be moved back on premises, or moved partially or entirely from one cloud to another. That means data movement and data liberation – the seamless transfer of data from one cloud to another – has become a major requirement. In this webcast, we’re going to explore some of these data movement and mobility issues with real-world examples from the University of Michigan. Register now for discussions on:

  • How do we secure data both at-rest and in-transit?
  • Why is data so hard to move? What cloud processes and interfaces should we use to make data movement easier?
  • How should we organize our data to simplify its mobility? Should we use block, file or object technologies?
  • Should the application of the data influence how (and even if) we move the data?
  • How can data in the cloud be leveraged for multiple use cases?

Webcast: Customer Support through Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning
Thursday, February 22, 2018
Webcast - 11:00 am PT / 2:00 pm ET

Presenters: Robin Marcenac, Sr. Managing Consultant, IBM, Ross Ackerman, Dir. Digital Support Strategy, NetApp, Alex McDonald, SNIA CSI

Abstract:

Watson is a computer system capable of answering questions posed in natural language. Watson was named after IBM's first CEO, Thomas J. Watson. The computer system was specifically developed to answer questions on the quiz show Jeopardy! (where it beat its human competitors) and was then used in commercial applications, the first of which was helping with lung cancer treatment.

NetApp is now using IBM Watson in Elio, a virtual support assistant that responds to queries in natural language. Elio is built using Watson’s cognitive computing capabilities. These enable Elio to analyze unstructured data by using natural language processing to understand grammar and context, understand complex questions, and evaluate all possible meanings to determine what is being asked. Elio then reasons and identifies the best answers to questions with help from experts who monitor the quality of answers and continue to train Elio on more subjects. 

Click here to register.

Webcast: Multi-Cloud Storage: Addressing the Need for Portability and Interoperability
Tuesday, December 12, 2017
Webcast - 12:00 pm PT / 3:00 pm ET

In a recent survey of enterprise hybrid cloud users, the Evaluator Group saw that nearly 60% of respondents indicated that lack of interoperability is a significant technology-related issue that they must overcome in order to move forward. In fact, lack of interoperability was chosen above public cloud security and network security as significant inhibitors. This webcast looks at enterprise hybrid cloud objectives and barriers with a focus on cloud interoperability within the storage domain and the SNIA’s Cloud Storage Initiative to promote interoperability and portability of data stored in the cloud. Click here for more information.

Webcast: Transactional Models & Their Storage Requirements
Tuesday, October 31, 2017
Webcast - 10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

We’re all accustomed to transferring money from one bank account to another; a credit to the payer becomes a debit to the payee. But that model uses a specific set of sophisticated techniques to accomplish what appears to be a simple transaction. We’re also aware of how today we can order goods online, or reserve an airline seat over the Internet. Or even simpler, we can update a photograph on Facebook. Can these applications use the same models, or are new techniques required? Click here for more information.