Webcasts On Demand

Introduction to Incast, Head of Line Blocking, and Congestion Management
Tuesday, June 18, 2019
10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

For a long time, the architecture and best practices of storage networks have been relatively well-understood. Recently, however, advanced capabilities have been added to storage that could have broader impacts on networks than we think.

The three main storage network transports - Fibre Channel, Ethernet, and InfiniBand – all have mechanisms to handle increased traffic, but they are not all affected or implemented the same way. For instance, placing a protocol such as NVMe over Fabrics can mean very different things when looking at one networking method in comparison to another.

New Landscape of Network Speeds
Tuesday, May 21, 2019
10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

In the short period from 2014-2018, Ethernet equipment vendors have announced big increases in line speeds, shipping 25, 50, and 100 Gigabits-per -second (Gb/s) speeds and announcing 200/400 Gb/s. At the same time Fibre Channel vendors have launched 32GFC, 64GFC and 128GFC technology while InfiniBand has reached 200Gb/s (called HDR) speeds. But who exactly is asking for these faster new networking speeds, and how will they use them? Are there servers, storage, and applications that can make good use of them? How are these new speeds achieved?

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Webcast: Everything You Wanted to Know...But Were Too Proud to Ask - The Memory Pod
Thursday, May 16, 2019
10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

In this webcast, SNIA experts will discuss the traditional uses of storage and memory as a cache, how we can build and use systems based on PM, what a system with storage, persistent memory and DRAM would look like, whether we need a new programming model to take advantage of PM, interesting use cases for systems equipped with PM, and how we might take better advantage of this new technology.

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Webcast: The Scale-Out File System Architecture Overview
Thursday, February 28, 2019
10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

This presentation will provide an introduction to scale-out-file systems and cover: general principles when architecting a scale-out file system storage solution; hardware and software design considerations for different workloads; storage challenges when serving a large number of compute nodes, e.g. name space consistency, distributed locking, data replication, etc.; use cases for scale-out file systems; and, common benchmark and performance analysis approaches

Webcast: Networking Requirements for Hyperconvergence
Tuesday, February 5, 2019
10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

In this webinar, we’re going to take a look behind the scenes, peek behind the GUI, so to speak. We’ll be talking about what goes on back there, and shine the light behind the bezels.

Webcast: File vs. Block vs. Object Storage
Tuesday, February 5, 2019
5:00 am ET / 10:00 am GMT

In this webcast, we will compare three types of data access: file, block and object storage, and the access methods that support them. Each has its own set of use cases, and advantages and disadvantages. 

Webcast: What NVMe™/TCP Means for Networked Storage
Tuesday, January 22, 2019
10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

In this webinar, the lead author of the NVMe/TCP specification, Sagi Grimburg, and J Metz, member of the SNIA and NVMe Boards of Directors, will discuss: what NVMe/TCP is and how it works, trade-offs, expectations, what network administrators should know, technologies that can make NVMe/TCP work better, and more!

Webcast: Virtualization and Storage Networking Best Practices
Thursday, January 17, 2019
10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

With all the different storage arrays and connectivity protocols available today, knowing the best practices can help improve operational efficiency and ensure resilient operations. VMware’s storage global service has reported many of the common service calls they receive...[more]

Webcast: Networking Requirements for Scale-Out Storage
Wednesday, November 14, 2018
Webcast - 10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

Scale-out storage is increasingly popular for cloud, high-performance computing, machine learning, and certain enterprise applications. Join this webinar to learn about scale-out storage solutions and what workloads they can address, how your network may need to evolve to support scale-out storage, and network considerations to ensure performance for demanding workloads

Webcast: FCoE vs. iSCSI vs. iSER
Thursday, June 21, 2018
Webcast - 10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET

The “Great Storage Debates” webcast series continues, this time on FCoE vs. iSCSI vs. iSER. Like past “Great Storage Debates,” the goal of this presentation is not to have a winner emerge, but rather provide vendor-neutral education on the capabilities and use cases of these technologies so that attendees can become more informed and make educated decisions.

One of the features of modern data centers is the ubiquitous use of Ethernet. Although many data centers run multiple separate networks (Ethernet and Fibre Channel (FC)), these parallel infrastructures require separate switches, network adapters, management utilities and staff, which may not be cost effective.

Multiple options for Ethernet-based SANs enable network convergence, including FCoE (Fibre Channel over Ethernet) which allows FC protocols over Ethernet and Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) for transport of SCSI commands over TCP/IP-Ethernet networks. There are also new Ethernet technologies that reduce the amount of CPU overhead in transferring data from server to client by using Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA), which is leveraged by iSER (iSCSI Extensions for RDMA) to avoid unnecessary data copying.

That leads to several questions about FCoE, iSCSI and iSER:

  • If we can run various network storage protocols over Ethernet, what differentiates them?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of FCoE, iSCSI and iSER?
  • How are they structured?
  • What software and hardware do they require?
  • How are they implemented, configured and managed?
  • Do they perform differently?
  • What do you need to do to take advantage of them in the data center?
  • What are the best use cases for each?

Join our SNIA experts as they answer all these questions and more on the next Great Storage Debate.

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